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Relations with Japan

When did Japanese people first come to Indonesia? For most ordinary Indonesians, the answer to that question may well be a cliche. Some may be quick to point to the landing of Japanese troops in the country in 1942, bringing to an end the long rule of the Dutch. At least, that is what most history textbooks here say.



When did Japanese people first come to Indonesia? For most ordinary Indonesians, the answer to that question may well be a cliche. Some may be quick to point to the landing of Japanese troops in the country in 1942, bringing to an end the long rule of the Dutch. At least, that is what most history textbooks here say. However, Des Alwi, from Banda island in Maluku and who now lives in (...)



Japanese businesses have long dominated the Indonesian market with their quality products, and have been undeterred by various regime change. They have even become accustomed to the way of "doing business" in Indonesia. Unlike a number of Western companies that have been here for more than a century, the arrival of Japanese corporations has been a relatively new phenomenon, starting only in the 19 (...)



Blok M in the mid-1980s was not the bustling nightlife hub of neon lights and signs in Japanese characters that it is today. Back then, it was known more for its daytime activities as a mid-range shopping area, its highlights a sprawling, open-air vegetable and fruit market fronting Ramayana department store, Aldiron Plaza with its haberdashery, batik painting and clock shops, street-side stalls s (...)



Many Japanese restaurants provide a "how-to" on chopsticks, but not much more. Japanese cuisine may not involve an army of cutlery and glasses as in fine French dining, but there are a few things to remember. If you've done either of the "Nevers" listed below, you'll know why the Japanese family at the next table was looking at you in horror. Do's with the Japanese (...)



Most Japanese people care about the environment. After all, Japan is the birthplace of the Kyoto Protocol. But love for the environment can boomerang on one in countries like Indonesia, where most people are not particularly concerned about the state of the planet. T. Kamamara (not his real name), an ambitious young executive who loves the environment, decided not to use plastic as it (...)



The oldest Japanese restaurant in Indonesia, Kikugawa, is located in Cikini, Central Jakarta. The owner, Terutake Kikuchi, celebrated the 36th anniversary of this homey establishment on April 21. According to Kikuchi's story, also published in Sarasa gourmet magazine, he came up with the idea of setting up a restaurant in 1960 and began to realize his dream in 1963. At the time, Japane (...)



One of the oldest izakaya in Blok M, South Jakarta, is Soba-dokoro Ajihara, run by proprietor Hikaru Harada. With its double red lanterns and smiling tobacconist out front - selling everything from Sampoerna to the ever-popular Mild Seven Japanese brand - the eatery extends a warm welcome to all guests who stop by. The minute the latticed rolling door slides open, a chorus of "Irasshai (...)



On any given day, the Jakarta Japan Club in the Skyline Building on Jl. Thamrin in Central Jakarta is a beehive of activity. Middle-aged women browse through Japanese videos in the library, while in the club's office executives prepare business proposals and engage in serious discussion. The Jakarta Japan Club (JJC) gives its members a space to meet and relax. The club also arranges an array of ac (...)



Centuries-old tea ceremony is still alive among Japanese, including Japanese community in Jakarta because - according to some - it touches all the human senses in silence. People attending a tea ceremony feel as if they are far from the hustle and bustle of the metropolis. The tea ceremony, or Cha-no-yu, originally represented a way of life, a philosophy of not only preparing and drink (...)



While most cultural centers deal mainly with matters of art and lifestyle, the Japan Foundation spices up Japan-Indonesia cultural exchanges with intellectual discourse. The institution has grown to become a cultural and information center for Japanese and Indonesians looking for insights into both countries. No fewer than 30,000 people visit the foundation's office in the Summitmas To (...)

    
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